Public Policy Institute for Wales launches report on social and emotional skills

7 March 2016

PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE FOR WALES LAUNCHES REPORT ON SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL SKILLS

Promoting Emotional Health, Well-being and Resilience in Primary Schools published last week by the Public Policy Institute for Wales (PPIW) provides an excellent analysis of the evidence on the importance of social and emotional skills (SES) for improving children’s life chances and the challenges of turning this evidence into effective practice in schools.

The report looks at both efforts to reduce emotional and behavioural difficulties as well as strategies to promote positive well-being. The authors emphasise the challenges of rolling out well-evidenced interventions in the context of the day to day pressures faced by teachers and other staff, and stress the importance of thinking about how SES can be integrated into the everyday ‘routine interactions of children’ inside and outside of school rather than being confined to a particular set of lessons or intervention.  Most critically the report makes the case for SES to be embedded within a whole school system so that it is ‘connected with – rather than competing with – other school priorities.’ The report makes a range of sound recommendations to take this agenda forward from further evaluation of whole school strategies in Wales, to establishing senior leadership responsibility and using the Pupil Deprivation Grant for universal and targeted approaches for children who are at greater risk of facing social and emotional difficulties.

As the work on ‘character’ develops in English schools, led by the Secretary of State for Education, it will be vital to join up the learning and insights across the UK.

Click here to read up on EIF’s work on social and emotional skills.

‘Promoting Emotional Health, Well-being and Resilience in Primary Schools’ was published by PPIW on 29 February 2016 and authored by Robin Banerjee, Colleen McLaughlin, Jess Cotney, Lucy Roberts and Celeste Peereboom from the University of Sussex.

For further details, contact Lauren Carter-Davies at info@ppiw.org.uk.